Behold the captivating charm of the Rufous Motmot, a feathered jewel with its distinctive long tail and vibrant plumage, gracefully painting the air with nature’s hues.

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His large bright orange chest and head are clearly interrupted by a clearly defined bandit-like black mask.

The Rufous Motmot


Photo Courtesy of ryanacandee / CC BY 2.0

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The rufous motmot (Baryphthengus martii) wears a suit of mostly cinnamon-rufous tones, except for a clearly defined black mask and a black spot on his chest. His wings are green as are his sides, as well as a greenish-blue lower abdomen, and a long dark blue tail and flight feathers. The ends of his tail are finished off with bare-shafted racket tips. The legs are black as is his bill.


Photo Courtesy of quitbanana / CC BY-SA 2.0

Male and female members of this species look quite similar.

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Juvenile birds can be differentiated by a lack of tail rackets, chest spot, and overall dull plumage.


Photo Courtesy of fveronesi1 / CC BY-SA 2.0

This bird is endemic to and found from northeastern Honduras south to western Ecuador, northern Bolivia, and western Brazil.

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Photo Courtesy of fveronesi1 / CC BY-SA 2.0

These birds like to inhabit humid lowland evergreen primary forested regions as well as secondary forests. They prefer tall trees, especially along rivers and streams avoiding dense foliage ranging from 1250 m (4,100 ft) to 1,600 m (5,200 ft).


Photo (cropped) Courtesy of Ignacio Zamora / CC BY 2.0

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Omnivorous birds, Rufous Motmots dine on a wide variety of insects, as well as lizards, fish, crabs, fruit, and vegetation.


Photo Courtesy of ryanacandee / CC BY 2.0

The breeding season for this bird varies from region to region but is generally between March and June when a long burrow is dug, anywhere between 10 to 16 feet (3 – 5 meters) long, though they will sometimes refurbish a mammal burrow. a clutch of 3-5 eggs is laid within.

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Photo Courtesy of Wildreturn / CC BY 2.0

This bird is regarded as of Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.


Photo Courtesy of ryanacandee / CC BY 2.0

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You can watch and listen to this bird right here in the video below:

https://youtube.com/watch?v=AI-DCMarPJY%3Ffeature%3Doembed

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